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eagles dad

for the last few months i’ve felt pretty energized, creatively speaking

(i’d been reading lynda barry’s syllabus, and i think that gave me quite a bit of fuel and confidence, both)

for the last few weeks my creative juices are feeling lower

i havent been putting out as many strips this month, and for some reason they’ve seemed harder to come by

i can only hope i’m in just a seasonal artistic funk

so this one is from the sketchbook

i’m not sure what to do with little moments like these, since they have dialogue and only feature one panel, which don’t seem to fit the rules i’ve created for myself here


in the meantime you can scroll through all of the ‘steps’ strips here

snowball time lapse

here’s the timelapse of me drawing the snowball comic strip

this is an interesting one to look at because the strip went through so many changes after i stopped recording

i decided to run it vertically

having no expression on the little guy in the last panel felt most right for the ‘punchline’

but even more interesting (to me i guess) was the decision to change the first panel

the close up of little guy packing a snowball seemed to ruin the ‘rhythm’ of the piece

that panel seemed too ‘big’ – too ‘loud’ for the next three panels

for some reason, it seems like the strip works better the smaller the changes between the panels

smaller the changes between panel the more power the final panel seems to have for me

i wonder why that is…

currently reading


Slowly reading Walter Isaacson’s Leonardo Da Vinci so I’ve been filling up my sketchbook with words instead of drawings.

I’m only 39 or so pages in, but most fascinating so far is Leonardo’s ‘mirror writing.’

Up until now I had considered his mirror writing a mystical facet of his ‘genius,’ however, Isaacson has completely demystified it for me.

The technique was merely a way for lefthanders to keep their hand from smearing the ink as they drew letters across the page.

Isaacson even mentions that there’s a 15th century calligraphy book that teaches lefthanded writers the technique.


notes on vertigo


Vertigo is such a strange film. I think its easy to forget how strange it is because it shows up on so many best of lists.

Vertigo must be Hitchcock’s most dreamlike film, particularly when Jimmy Stewart’s Scottie, is tracking Kim Novak’s Madeline through the city.

And once Scottie runs into Judy, the movie completely jettisons the mystery at the center of the narrative and focuses solely on Scottie’s obsession with Madeline, made even creepier by the age difference between Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak.

The film is made even creepier by watching Jimmy Stewart behave so obsessively.

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