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Trek Fan Shirt

I made up a fan shirt in time for the new Star Trek movie that came out a month ago.

ST Fan Shirt

I ended up canning this image; or the slogan, anyway.  It just felt too insider-ish. First you had to get the reference to Shepard Fairey’s Obama Hope Poster. But even if you got that reference, unless you were a hard core trekkie, you were left scratching your head at the IDIC slogan.

So, instead I went to print with this image, instead.

Spock Fan Shirt Final

I wanted to do a Kirk shirt as well, but I didn’t have the right one-word slogan. Yet.

The Mysterious Connection between Indy 4 and Back to the Future!

But first, here’s a look at the finished Indy 4 Fan Shirt. Indy 4 the Movie was a disappointing failure on a variety of levels, but the Indy 4 Fan Shirt looks terrific!

Merry, my printer on these shirts, once again did an incredible job; and she’s great to work with. It seems I’m always on a tight deadline, I always have last minute changes; and she is always there to get me through it. Thanks Merry! And even though the movie wasn’t very good, you can still get the wallpaper version of my Indy Fan Shirt. You’ll find it on the sidebar under the pages heading.

Now, for the Mysterious Connection Between the flaw-filled Indy 4 and the flawless Back to the Future.

If you’ve seen Indy 4, then you remember the sequence of the film where Indy found himself in the fake town set up at the heart of the nuclear testing and has to hide in a lead lined refrigerator to shield himself from the blast?

Well, about five or so years ago, I read an early draft of the screenplay for Back to the Future, back before the Bobs, Zemeckis and Gale, had conjured up the storytelling solution of the lightning bolt, the clock tower and the 1.21 gigawatts of electricity to power the DeLorean.

In fact, the time machine wasn’t even a DeLorean in this version. It was a refrigerator and it was nuclear powered. Doc and Marty have to get the refrigerator to the only place where nuclear power is available back in 1952; the nuclear testing site out in the middle of the desert, where the military has set up…you guessed it, a fake town; complete with mannequins, to study the effects of an atomic blast. Marty has to climb into the refrigerator/time machine to get sent back to the future. There’s even a moment when Doc Brown is worried that it won’t work and hopes that the leadlined fridge will be enough to protect Marty from the blast…sound familiar?

Zemeckis and Spielberg are buddies, so I’m sure that it’s no coincidence, and it’s interesting to see an idea that wasn’t used get recycled twenty years later. And as I’m writing this, it occurs to me that they may have talked about this previous version in the behind-the-scenes extras on the DVD set…

Of course the clock tower and bolt of lightning are a much more elegant solution for Back to the Future. The clock tower, after all, gives them a visual representation of time; as abstract a concept as there ever was, and since Back to the Future is one of my favorite movies, it’s good to know that it wasn’t formed whole; that the Bobs had to write and write and rewrite to pound out such a beautifully flawless flick.

I wonder if there’s any other cinematic examples out there of unused ideas getting recycled into later films? I seem to remember a dream sequence that went unused in the first Toy Story, only to be revived for the sequel. That’s the beauty of working on a project, you soon have more ideas than you can use; allowing you to recycle your own stuff…

Anybody else have any examples of creators recycling their own ideas, cinematic or otherwise?

Adios.

Process

I had every intention of going to bed early tonight, but I don’t want to miss posting, particularly if I don’t have a good excuse, so I’ve been busy constructing today’s post about the process of putting together a tshirt design for one of my best friends. His birthday is coming up.

Process fascinates me; I love to know how it is that people work; so here is how I work. Sometimes. Other times I work quite differently.

My friend Binh mentioned a line he had heard recently; one of those bits of wisdom that gets tossed around, and he said he’d like a tshirt made out of it. I jotted it down on a handy napkin, doodled an accompanying sketch and it never got any farther than that.

I think that was about two years ago. Here’s the napkin:

About five months ago, I found the napkin and decided it was time to get something concrete down. My initial thought was the text would be very polished; very solid and the worm would be done a little looser; sketchier… maybe show the worm without the hook, and suggest his ultimate fate with an image of a hook on the back….

That would be the front of the shirt…this would be the back…

I thought I was off to a good start, but I wasn’t wowed… And was it necessary to split the design into a front and back? If someone just read the front, or just read the back, would it make sense to them? I couldn’t justify splitting the design into two separate images, so I decided to combine them; toying with the idea that the worm would make a great visual substitute for the “I” in life. I’m now a little sickened by my attempt to be so clever.

I’m also not thrilled with the the fact that the horizontal line has no other purpose in the design other than to divide the text.

I reluctantly eliminate the hook, enthusiastically eliminate the horizontal line and eliminate a color. The design works; but it’s not wowing me, and I also miss the implied messiness that the brown brought to the image. So decide to bring it back as the shirt color. I needlessly add white to the design. The results are ugly.

So ugly in fact that I give up. For a day. Then, while at work, it occurs to me that the earth worm needs dirt to wiggle in.

Unfortunately, the dirt is the only part of the design that I like, now. In fact, I have grown to hate my thick-lined poorly drawn worm.

I decide to get reference.

Here is the uninspired result that reference brings. Inexplicably, I have made the worm navy and my dirt has disappeared…

At this point, I like the font for the word life, but hate how spread out and open it looks around the circle. The worm is almost interesting at this point, but the colors aren’t working for me. Everything looks so blah on a white shirt, and while the bottom line of text wrapping around the circle is nice, it really makes the the second half of the line seem like it’s just dangling out in the middle of nowhere. And I still miss the messiness of the dirt.

I abandon the design, and it’s a good thing I do, because I’m about to make a huge leap and the only way I could make that leap; a leap that is both forward and back at the same time; is with time away from the design. I’m lucky, there’s no deadline on this job. Time is a luxuy I can afford.

So, one night, on the way home from soccer, it hits me. It hits me not quite fully formed; but close.

The backwards leap I’ve made is to the chocolate shirts, and one color. I’ve brought back the dirt and added a distress layer to messy things up a little. I’ve flipped the direction that the worm is facing; giving some much needed contrast to the orderliness of the my font choice for the word Life.

I’ve now broken up the sentence into four distinct sections. Life is big and bold, so the eye heads there first, then follows the curve of handscrawled text to the head of the worm; where we begin to read left to right again. The smaller words TO and A are smaller than the word WORM, and so I make them physically smaller. The word DIGGING is more active and descriptive than the rest of the words on its line; so it too gets to be physically larger.

The hand-scrawled quality of the last line provides emphasis, much in the way that italics do in the body of a sentence.

Everything is really working for me now; so I further refine the design.

I eliminate the dirt from the design, deciding that the distress is messy enough, though I raise the distress above the last line of text so that it doesn’t lose any emphasis.

I pull the worm in closer to the word life, giving the design an almost “R” shape. It’s much more visually interesting than the previous arc-shaped incarnation. Because the worm is now overlapping some text, I outline it in shirt color to add separation.

I wrap the text around the worm-shape…it’s not perfect, but I think it still reads. Another weak point is the new area of trapped negative space between the LI in life and the body of the worm. I try to fill it as best I can with “to” and “a.” It is almost successful, and I enlarge the word worm, but, man, that’s a big comma. The last lines remain virtually unchanged.

The “finished” product is by no means brilliant, but I really think it’s working. The distress and the worm itself give a contrast in texture to the bold block letters. The handwritten text provides emphasis. The eye gets pulled all around the design, but I don’t think it is ever confusing. It reads; and has an interesting shape.

But maybe your analysis will be different?

Well, this post went on much longer than I thought it would, but its been fun writing about how this design came together (or not, if you disagree); I don’t get to delve much into thought process at work; so this has been an interesting exercise.

If you’ve stayed with me this long, thanks for your time.

Short Round; but More Importantly, A Penguin

Sweet!

My friend and bro-at-work, Don, has been making and painting penguins for about a year and a half or so. Everywhere he goes, he sees penguins; then he meticulously paints them, (sometimes with nothing more than a nail, well, and some paint) and shares them with the world. Here’s one he made for me out of the six-pack packaging from one of my favorite ales, Third Stone Brown, from Empyrean Ales.

See, how it says Bro Tone? What a perfect Screentone tribute. Don, I’m honored.
And I wasn’t going to post this at all, since I hate it, but after showing you the sketch, it wouldn’t be fair to not show you the finished product. Besides, now I don’t have to hate it all alone; you can hate it with me!

First Post and an Indy Fan Shirt!

I’ve been giving a lot of thought to a website. There’s a lot of interesting stuff out there, and I’d like to share it, but doing so by email is tedious. Screentone allows me to pluck my notebook from my pocket and share it with the world. Or, at least, the select few who are in the know.

The other thought behind having a website is to show what I make, and websites like myspace and facebook, which seem to do that sort of thing very well, don’t seem to be my sort of thing.

So, here I am. I picked up a copy of WordPress for Dummies, and have been reading it, and it’s been great, but before I dive in; try to design a website proper, select a web hosting service and attempt to do a bunch of other stuff that I have no idea how to do, I thought that this; quickly tossing together a blog on the cheap, might be the way to go, while I continue to learn about everything else.

This first post will also give me the opportunity to unveil my Indiana Jones fan shirt, in honor of the new movie (which I’m afraid is going to suck, but which I’m going to see on opening day, nonetheless) and in anticipation of Lego Indy for Playstation! I think the design for the T may go through a couple of minor changes before it sees print, but you get the idea…

Also, the header image is a photo of a stack of my clean dishes. I’ve also got to try and figure out how to move my blog title from the middle of the header.

I hope this works, and be sure to check back tomorrow…

oooh….the white may be even better…