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lately i just cant get enough of drawing the spidey doodles

spidey swinging home after a long day of spider-manning

i like to think that his costume is in a constant state of repair. hastily stitched together.

and his webbing, though awesome, is never quite perfect. every batch a little different.

media:

  • a little fountain pen action and some brush pen on top of pencil
  • those crayola markers that kids use but it just soaked up the ink, (not waterproof) and made the whole thing pretty dark
  • spidey’s left foot colored in with an orange and red colored pencils

Peanut Spidey

Here’s another shot at inking and coloring a peanut Spidey in Freehand.

First the sketch.

Then the inked and colored version.

The linework feels more lively than my previous example, but I don’t know if Spidey feels very peanut-y anymore, though.

Just finished reading:

This is the first Tintin story I’ve ever read; and it really blew my hair back. Though this collection is black and white, I’ve seen color samples of Herge’s strip and they’re just beautiful.

In fact, don’t this;

and this;

seem to have a lot in common? (You can check out my previous post on this piece here.)

And so far, this link is the best look at Herge‘s process that I’ve found.

screentone out

illustrating a comics page

The Origin of the Amazing Spider-Foo. A parody comic. Script by Crhymes. Art by Tone.

Here’s a one-page comic I recently illustrated called the ‘The Origin of The Amazing Spider-Foo’. It’s a Spider-Man parody written by Crhymes; a writer, comedian, and musician based out of San Diego.

From Script to Rough Layout

Originally conceived of as a one-page 12 inch by 12 inch record insert, Crhyme’s script was a brillliant parody of Stan Lee’s verbose Marvel Comics stories.

Here’s the script:

My first task was to break the text up in to individual panels. I was originally thinking a 9 panel grid, but couldn’t squeeze all of the text in, so I added a tenth introduction panel on top. I even started thinking about color at this stage. Here’s an early rough that was meant just for me.

I refined my roughs and sent them over to Crhymes. (I sent them without color, since I wasn’t sure yet what my color plan was.)

At this point, Crhymes had some much-needed suggestions to help make my drawings more convincing, including the addition of palm trees, making Spidey-Foo’s sandals more accurate, and adding tattoos to Pedro Parker’s arms and neck. Crhymes also wanted Spider-Foo to break the panel borders in the last panel.

Changes are welcome at this rough stage because they’re easy to make before inks and color are added.

Pushing and Refining the Poses

At this time I also decided to push the poses in the piece, especially in panels 1 and 2. (The poses of those two panels in the roughs just looked too similar to me.) Pedro Parker also looked too relaxed in panel 3, so I changed up that pose as well.

Here’s a few rough drawings I made while working on the piece.

Digitally Inking the Comics Page

Inking went slowly for me, though you wouldn’t know it from the timelapse below.

If only I could work that fast.

I originally estimated the page would take me about 6 – 8 hours, but each panel took about 3 hours including rough drawing, inks, lettering, and colors.

A lot of that time was spent trying things that didn’t work out, like those early rough colors, or some of the unused poses, for instance. And a lot of undos. Undo. Undo. Undo. Making comics is hard.

Here’s the final inks.

Coloring the Comics Page

I finished the colors, (done on a separate layer from the inks and pencils, as you can see above), choosing not to show Spider-Foo in full-color until the final couple of panels.

I sent the final artwork to Crhymes. He had a few edits to the text, which was no problem since the lettering was a well-crafted font I purchased from PixelSagas.

Leading up to San Diego ComicCon, Crhymes started posting a panel a day to his Instagram. Crhymes is wild, ambitious, and smart. It’s my guess that he has a lot of stories in him, and not just Spider-Man parodies.

I’m grateful he took a chance on this fairly untested comics-maker.

Go buy a shirt from him, or a print of the comic, while he works on his next project.

putting together steps volume 2

last night, after little guy went to bed, i started laying out steps volume 2 while watching avengers: infinity war on netflix. (it was good. but brutal. spidey’s death was heartbreaking.)

i was going to reveal the cover here, but right before i pressed ‘publish’ i decided to keep it hidden…

volume 2 collects all of the february 2018 comics

volume 1 is still available in the shop. ( i’m biased of course, since it’s me assembling these by hand, but it’s still amazing to me how good these little zines feel. the colors look great too.)

of course you can still read steps here on the website or watch some timelapse videos of the comics coming together

and i’ve started filling my sketchbook with the bones of new strips i can’t wait to get to work on

welcome to the internet archive of tone

browse some comics by in the internet archive of tone

comics

new comics posted irregularly

the latest doodles and experiments from the internet archive of tone

sketchnotes

the latest sketches, experiments, and news

buy some stuff from the internet archive of tone

shop

buy a little something and help keep the site running

friend(s) of tone

friends

eggman

welcome

welcome to the internet archive of tone. (i’ve always wanted a place to put everything. here it is.)

i’ve got a lot of interests, so maybe you’ll enjoy something i’ve made.

there’s comics. my most popular ongoing comic is called steps, but you might enjoy ernie and fitz, the misadventures of man-child f. scott fitzgerald and the toxic masculinity of ernest hemingway.

i’m also proud of my collaboartion with mcwhitsteen, the casablanca and teenage mutant ninja turtle mashup, everybody comes to raph’s.

hmmm. what else…what else?

oh!

i made a wordless picture book done entirely in crayon

i’ve made some limited animation

i’ve dabbled in interactive fiction

i’ve done some illustration

what else is in the internet archive of tone?

i’ve done a few inktobers. 2017 was sherlock holmes themed. 2018 was metal gear solid themed.

i make fan art.

i also write mediocre, inauthentic, haiku movie reviews.

mostly i just goof off in my sketchbook.

not just an archive. also a shop

i set up a little shop to try to make this site self-sustaining. how it works is you buy something. i send it to you. and the lights stay on a little longer

there’s also a newsletter. and an archive of newsletters

it doesn’t go out very often, but you can sign up for the newsletter. it arrives in your inbox about once a month at best. (maybe visit the archive and take a few for a spin before you commit.)

and some miscellaneous designy type stuff

i’ve designed tshirts, maps, and a not-toy called herocaps

hire tone

and finally, if you need to hire me for comics or illustration work, or just want to drop me a line, you can email me at tone@screentone.org.

digital

day1wordpress

map of day’s journey in nyc, 2017

 

tree2

 

timing, 2016

 

 

povondra

 

avatar icon, photoshop, 2015

selfportraitanimation

 

self portrait, photoshop, gif, 2015

 


Romantically-Active

photoshop, 2015
rhythmically-active-spidey

 

photoshop, 2015

Rodeo-Active-Spider-Man

photoshop, 2015

 

Radio-Active-Spider-Man

photoshop, 2015

042215spidey

spidey, photoshop, 2015

Apples1

apples to apples, photoshop, 2015
021715 1c

leo, photoshop, 2015leo

 

leo, photoshop, 2015021115 2

kauai mountain, photoshop, 2015

011915 3

nebraska, photoshop, 2015010815 Hemingway2

hemingway on safari, photoshop, 2015121614 14

robin, photoshop, 2015

 

120314 Receptacle

receptacle, photoshop, 2014

VolcanoesCropped

emily dickinson, photoshop, 2014IMG_4232

fox mulder, 2014
Third Man

third man poster, 2014IMG_4228

 

scully, photoshop, 2014

Image-11

spidey 2, 2014

 

spidey

spidey, 2014

 

 

Peanut Preview

Here’s a look at a sketch done in preparation for my piece for an upcoming art show. Be warned: “Thar’ be crazies on that link!”

The theme I’m participating in is Peanut People; right now the name of my piece is Peanut Gallery. I’m going to draw gobs of characters from fact and fiction.

Here’s a color version of Peanut Spidey.

As always, you can click on the image for a closer look.

The inks are too heavy; too lifeless; no thicks and thins; no line variety in general. (Inks were done in Macromedia Freehand, by the way. I used the variable stroke pen tool. If I had it to do again, I’d use the Bezier pen tool. More control.)

I’m fairly happy with the color job. Also done in Freehand.

More on the way!

screentone out

Epiphany

Coupla weeks ago. The comic book store; after a few pints. It’s the last place you’d expect an epiphany.

Buddy Don is scoping out the Star Wars action figures; I’m whining about work.

Don picks up an action figure based on the Ralph McQuarrie concept art. The toys themselves look pretty chintsy, but most toys do. The packages, however; loaded with McQuarrie’s artwork, look terrific.

“The trouble with working at a tshirt shop,” I say, “all I ever get to design is tshirts. I don’t get to learn anything else. I’d like to try some package design.”

Don looks at me like I’m an idiot.

“Then design an action figure tshirt,” he says.

Epiphany: I am an idiot.

It’s up to me to learn what I want to learn.

Because I’m an idiot, a week goes by before I realize I need to scrap my idea for the upcoming art show and instead design a package for my Hulk Herocap, (Herocap origin for another day) and enter that in the show.

I start to take a closer look at the construction of boxes. I make a trip to Wal-Mart and pick up a Spider-Man Mighty Muggs. (The colors on the Mighty Muggs boxes are appealing; if a little flat. I love the top panel, with the close up of Spidey’s Eyes, but overall, the boxes are a little boring. Why have a static image of the exact same thing that’s in the box? The box design should be more than appealing; it should be exciting. But the packages do feel very solid, not at all flimsy, which I like.)

I do a little package design research online: to try and learn techniques for cutting the boxes so i get a nice smooth line; if I have to worry about the ink bleeding, where I can get a plastic mold insert to secure my Herocap in the middle of the box. I find a couple of interesting sites: The Dieline and Package Design Magazine, but I find little on the nuts and bolts of making your own boxes.

I am on my own.

I start drawing up templates for the box on graph paper.

You saw some of the artwork for the Hulk box last week.

I learn a lot from the box of a Dashboard Monk that Don’s brother Les gave me.

I learn even more from finally putting together a mock up of my own box.

Here’s the artwork. If you take a closer look ( by clicking on it), you can see that I don’t have flaps on the side panels, and you can see that I ran out of room on my graph paper; so I didn’t have a back panel, which was going to be fine, because I would cut it out when I cut out the cardboard backer.

Only, when I cut out the panel, I cut it out an inch shorter than it needs to be; so I end up with a, what, parallelogram? With the front panel one inch wider than the back panel.

After I put it all together, I color in Spidey’s mask with a magic marker so that it’s brighter. The cross shape is the graph paper glued onto a cardboard backer. What you can’t see is the giant glue glob resulting from my clumsiness. What you can see is that the box is just too big for the Hulk Herocap prototype. Don’t worry, I will be making up a Spidey Herocap.

The cardboard interior felt dark, so I added a sheet of paper to brighten things up:

You can see here where I had to trim the top of the box to run (semi) flush with the side panels.

I kind of like the box shape. I think I’m going to use it; just flip it around so that the small panel is in front…Failure is the perfect teacher and I learn a lot.

Design a smaller box. Set up a cutting and gluing station separate from your drawing table. Be sure of measurements.

News, Another Post from the Archives

I just got Binh’s Perspective shirt back from the printer, and boy, do they look terrific. (See below for a lengthy post on the process behind the design.

It was Binh’s birthday today, so I was able to put a shirt in his hands, which is a great feeling. And he saw the Short Round design, and really wants one, so I guess I’ll be printing up a half dozen or so of those after all.

I don’t have time for a longer post, so here’s another one from the archives.

I love the contrast of having a huge and bitter cap with skinny, young, and naive Spidey. The hopeless dreamer in me thinks this would be a great story, but when will I ever work on it?

Time to go see a movie! (See what I mean?)